Wednesday, 29 January 2014

How do you download and install Eclipse for Java development

This is another in a series of videos that I am producing for my YouTube channel HowDoYouDoStuff.


In this video, I am going to show you how to download and install Eclipse for Java development


You can read the transcript below.


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Transcript

Hi guys. I'm Phil Stirpe.

In this video, I am going to show you how simple it is to download and install Eclipse for Java development.

In an earlier video, I showed you how easy it is to write a simple class and compile it from the command line. However, it is more common for developers to use an integrated development environment - IDE such as Eclipse.

It is for that reason, that I am demonstrating how to download and install it today.

I'll start by jumping into a browser and searching for Eclipse EE downloads. EE stands for Enterprise Edition. There are several editions and the EE edition is suited to a wide range of application types including web applications.

I'll follow the suggested link and find a page that lists a variety of editions and versions. They also vary by Windows architcture. i.e. 32bit or 64 bit.

You can see here that there is an edition named Eclipse IDE for Java Developers. This is a nice light weight edition to get started but as I am involved in creating a wide variety of application types, I am going to need the EE edition.

Incidentally, you can see here that this version is named Juno. In fact, since recording the screen for this demo some months back, a new version has been released named Kepler.

And should you require an earlier version, you can search for it by name. For instance, the version before Juno was named Indigo and I would like to install that version for a course I am delivering.

So let me nip back to Google and update my search to specify Indigo. Sure enough, there is a link shown for the correct page.

I still want the Enterprise Edition and for 64bit Windows.

So if I click on that link, I am taken to the next page where I will find the download button.

I am now offered the standard download dialog so that I can select Save As. I'll place the download in my demo folder.

Due to the size of the file, it will take some time to download. According to this, it will take just under 10 minutes.

So I'll skip ahead to the end.

Ten minutes later....

So now that the installer has been downloaded, I can switch to the folder that I placed it in.

I'll right click the file and unzip it to the root of C:

This too takes a few minutes, so I'll skip to the end.

5 minutes later ...

Now this installer wasn't really an installer at all.

It was simply a zip file that when extracted gives you a folder named eclipse containing the application and its resources.

The application file is this one named eclipse which I will pin to my task bar.

From there, I'll click the icon to run it.

I'll click on the Run button on this security dialog to proceed.

And as you can see, Eclipse is now launching.

As Eclipse launches, it prompts you for a workspace. This is essentially a working directory. It can in fact change from session to session. Or perhaps if you share a computer, different developers might use different workspaces.

For now, I'll create a workspace within my Java Demo folder on the Desktop. By the way, it needn't be named Workspace.

Once Eclipse has launched, you are presented with the Welcome page. From here you can access samples, tutorials and some documentation.

I'll jump straight into the workbench by clicking this icon here.

The workbench comprises several windows such as the Project Explorer, Markers and Outline and we'll see more of them in future demos and videos.

But for now, that is all we have time for.

Eclipse is clearly working.

There you have it.

In this video, I have shown you how easy it is to download and install Eclipse for Java development.

Thanks for watching and please feel free to comment on my blog (www.philipstirpe.com) and Facebook page (www.facebook.com/philip.stirpe.tutorials). Perhaps you could suggest more video topics? Most of all, don't forget to subscribe to keep up with my videos as I release them.

Bye for now.



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See you soon

Phil Stirpé
"I don't do average!"






Write a simple JAVA program in Notepad and compile with javac

This is another in a series of videos that I am producing for my YouTube channel HowDoYouDoStuff.


In this video, I am going to show you how to write a simple JAVA program in Notepad and compile with javac


You can read the transcript below.


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Transcript

Hi guys. I'm Phil Stirpe.

In this video, I am going to show you how simple it is to write a simple JAVA program in Notepad and compile it with javac.

In an earlier video, I showed you how to download in install the Java Development Kit - JDK.

I also showed you how to define a number of environment variables so that Windows could locate the JDK files no matter where you were on the command line.

In this video, I just want to write a simple program to test that everything is working as it should.

So I'll create a new folder off the Desktop named FirstClass to work in.

Next, I'll create a file to contain my java class. I'm creating it as a text file because that is what code files usually are.

Now convention has it that the first program that you write in a language should be the classic Hello World app but I'm going to call mine hiGuys and change the extension to .java rather than .txt.

I am proud to say that I have never written a Hello World app. Well I'm either proud or pedantic.

Right. Let me edit that file in Notepad so that I can add some code.

You write a simple class by typing in the keyword: class followed by the class name. In this case hiGuys. This in turn should be followed by a pair of curly braces to define the scope of the class.

As I want my program to run independently on the command line, I must provide it with a main method which should be a public static that returns a void (or nothing).

The main method should have a pair of curly braces also.

Actually, I should probably add a string array named args to capture any command line arguments. I don't need them in this program but it is very common.

OK. I just need to add one line of code to this method. I want to call the println method which is defined in the System.out package. And I'll pass the method my string message of "Hi guys!!".

Not forgetting the semi-colon that needs to terminate each statement.

This is a very simple class containing a single method.

I just need to save it before moving on to the build process.

To build this I need to go to the command line.

Let me make a note of this folder location first.

Now I can open the command line and then change directory to the location of my source file.

Now although the source file is here, the compiler isn't.

Remember though that I have added a path to the compiler in the Environment variables.

So I can go ahead and type in javac higuys.java and press enter.

Note there is no echo here but my source code has compiled.

We can see the compiled code here in the folder. It has the class file extension.

The fact that my code compiled proves that not only has java and the javac compiler been installed but that I have also set the correct paths in the environment variables.

In order to run or execute my code, I now need to type in java higuys which is the file name given to my compiled code.

My mistake. That cannot run. I forgot that java is case sensitive and I had used a capital G in my name.

So this time, I'll try java hiGuys.

And there you go, my message is echoed to the console.

So there you go.

In this video I showed you how to test the JDK by writing a simple class, building it with javac and running it with the java runtime environment - JRE.

Now it is all well and good to write simple code in Notepad but in the real world, developers use more powerful tools to do their development. One such integrated development environment - IDE tool is Eclipse and in my next video, I will show you how to download and install it.

Thanks for watching this video. I hope you found it useful. Feel free to comment on my blog (www.philipstirpe.com) and Facebook page (www.facebook.com/philip.stirpe.tutorials). Perhaps you could suggest more video topics? Most of all, don't forget to subscribe to keep up with my videos as I release them.

Bye for now.



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See you soon

Phil Stirpé
"I don't do average!"






Sunday, 26 January 2014

Apply a transparency to a Text Box in Powerpoint

This is another in a series of videos that I am producing for my YouTube channel HowDoYouDoStuff.


In this video, I am going to show you how to apply a transparency to a Text Box in Powerpoint


You can read the transcript below.


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Transcript

Hi guys

I'm Phil Stirpe

In this video go to show you how to apply transparency to a text box in PowerPoint.

This the kind of thing you might want to do if you want to add watermark effect.

So here is an off-the-shelf presentation template from PowerPoint.

Now if I go and insert text box, put in my text, and boost my size a bit, let's imagine this is my watermark.

Now if you go looking for transparency you will find it hard to locate.

In fact if you select the text box itself you will never find it.

What you need to do is select the text within the control.

PowerPoint struggles if there aren't any spaces.

For example if I right click this text you can see that I'm offered add to dictionary

If I add in a space and try again you will see that I am now offered Format Text Effects.

I'll just remove the space and try again and hope that PowerPoint will still give me the option. And it does.

If I select Format Text Effects and select Text Fill, there I will find Transparency.

I will type in 50% and click the Close button.

As you can see I now have some semi-opaque text.

Incidentally if I select the text and choose Format from the menu and look for Format Text Effects you will see that Transparency is not available

You must do it by right clicking the text itself and using the context menu.

There you go that's how easy it is to apply transparency to a text box in PowerPoint

See you next time and don't forget to subscribe!



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See you soon

Phil Stirpé
"I don't do average!"